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In this issue:
First Protons Injected into the LHC
Safety Today: Lanyard Hazard
Secretary Bodman's Talk Available Online
Summer Program Presentations
Certificate in Supervision Registration

SLAC Today

Tuesday - August 12, 2008

First protons in the Large Hadron Collider. (Image courtesy of CERN. Click for larger image.)

First Protons Injected
into the LHC

The Large Hadron Collider saw its first protons Friday, around 6:30 p.m. at CERN (9:30 a.m. U.S. PDT), as scientists conducted the first beam injection test in one section of the collider. The protons traveled just a few meters into the LHC in a clockwise direction. The tests continued through the weekend to transfer the beam from one section of the accelerator complex to another. A second beam injection test is scheduled for later in August. Protons will circulate around the entire collider for the first time on September 10.

See also the press release on interactions.org. Learn more in "LHC Sees First Protons" on physicsworld.com.

(Column - Safety Today)

Lanyard Hazard

(Image - red GLAST lanyard)

ISEMS: It's not just for heavy equipment and high voltage. But party favors? Believe it. It's fast, easy, and could save life and limb. The Integrated Safety and Environmental Management System needs to be a natural part of all your work planning, and you can apply it as quickly as you put on your SLAC badge in the morning.

Take the example of a decorative lanyard.

Scope the work (safety core function 1): Handily wearing your badge and dosimeter about your neck.

Identify the hazard (function 2): In order to be safe, a lanyard must have a breakaway feature, so that it will release if tugged with force. A lanyard without breakaway capability can cause serious injury if it snags on an object or machinery, especially anything with moving parts. No matter how big or strong you may be, the thick webbing of the lanyard around your neck will be stronger. The lanyard shown above has no breakaway fastener.

Mitigate the hazard (function 3): If you have a lanyard that lacks a breakaway feature, please cut it open so that it cannot be used again.

Perform the work safely (core function 4): Use a lanyard with a breakaway clasp, or clip the badge to your shirt pocket.

Review the job, and find ways to improve (core function 5): That's what this article is doing.

The next time you are planning any work task—big or small—take a moment to consider potential safety issues and do what you can to mitigate them ahead of time. Please call Steve Frey at x3839 if you have any questions.

Secretary Bodman's Talk Available Online

A recording of Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman's August 7 all-hands address and a transcript of his remarks are now available on energy.gov.

Last Thursday, Secretary Bodman addressed Department of Energy staff to discuss U.S. energy and national security challenges, and highlight the unique ability of the DOE complex to respond to these challenges both today and in the future. The remarks were preceded by a slideshow of images reflecting the wide-ranging work and accomplishments of the DOE.

Summer Program Presentations

The SLAC community is invited to hear presentations by this summer's Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) students, Katherine Pope Fellow, and Science Teachers and Researchers (STAR) participants. With the help of dedicated mentors, these interns have engaged in a variety of science and engineering projects at SLAC over the last eight weeks. They will share highlights of their summer projects on August 14 in the Research Office Building's Redwood Room A/B, according to this schedule. Please drop in! Contact Susan Schultz (x2543) with any questions.

Certificate in Supervision Registration

SLAC Training and Development announces the next Certificate in Supervision program, beginning Thursday, September 25. The certificate series is a nine-class program designed to teach supervisors and managers effective leadership skills to meet the demands of SLAC’s workplace and to promote optimal employee performance.

The program is open to all SLAC supervisors and managers and to anyone who wants to prepare to become a manager. Permission from your supervisor is required.

Supervisors with two or fewer years of supervisory experience at SLAC are required to take four of the certificate classes, including Introduction to Supervision, Legal Issues in Supervision, Setting Expectations, and Creating a Safe and Sound Workplace. Register online to attend the next certificate series.

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