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In this issue:
Turkey Plans an Accelerator Center
Come Play Ball!

SLAC Today

Tuesday - September 15, 2009

Turkey Plans an Accelerator Center

The proposed Turkish Accelerator Center will include a set of accelerators and storage rings that be used in various combinations.

Over the last ten years, Turkish physicists have been working diligently to build a national accelerator center, which would serve as a core science facility and offer increased opportunities for Turkish students. It would be the first accelerator facility in the country, and only the second in the Middle East.

After much planning, excitement is building over the construction of the first phase of the project, a testing and research facility called the Turkish Accelerator and Radiation Laboratory at Ankara, or TARLA for short. Scheduled to be completed in 2012, it will be an Infrared Free Electron Laser, capable of producing an intense laser beam of infrared light for research in a wide variety of sciences ranging from physics to chemistry to biology and medicine.

As the construction of TARLA gets underway, three Turkish physicists have been touring three US national laboratories—SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and Argonne National Laboratory—to learn more about specific types of accelerator technology and experiments.

The visits represent more than simply a technical exchange. While at SLAC, the physicists raised the possibility of future collaborations.

"The main reason we are here is to be able to establish a collaboration between SLAC and our project so we can have an exchange of students and scientists," said Suat Ozkorucuklu, an experimental high-energy physicist from Suleyman Demirel University. "We are looking forward to having our students, young scientists, be trained and educated, and maybe work towards their degrees at SLAC." 

Read more in Symmetry Breaking.

Come Play Ball!

(Photo - The Drell-Richter Trophy)
The Drell-Richter trophy.

Grab your glove, buy some Cracker Jacks and start loosening up your throwing arm—it's time for the 2009 SLAC's Annual Softball Game, Sunday, September 27 at 2 p.m., at Stanford's Roble Field. Bring a glove if you have one, but all other equipment will be provided and extra gloves are available. Arrive as early as 1 p.m. to meet your teammates and begin warming up for what could be the game of the year.

This year's underdogs, The Researchers, look to challenge the defending champions, The Accelerators, for the coveted Drell-Richter trophy and yearlong bragging rights. This year's Accelerator team will be captained by Tom Markiewicz. The Research team will be captained by Dan Harrington. After the game, players from both teams are invited to rehash the highlights over refreshments.

"Anyone across the lab can participate," said SLAC employee and game organizer Michael Woods. "You just need to figure out which team you contribute more to, the Accelerators or the Researchers." If you are one of those employees who falls in the middle—like Captain Dan Harrington—the captains can help you figure out which team you should play for.

According to the SLAC Annual Softball Game Web site, the tradition started when Sidney "Lefty" Drell and Burton "Big Daddy" Richter brought the student versus faculty tradition from Stanford University up to SLAC in the early 1960s. Originally, the competition was between Theory and Experiment, but as the lab expanded so did the ball game. The change to Accelerators versus Researchers was made in 2007 to reflect the expanding science mission at SLAC. The organizers said they hope to see players from every area of the lab at this year's game.

For more information, visit the 2009 SLAC Annual Softball Game Web site or contact your team captain. All new players are welcome; let's play ball!

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